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Contractor selection marks milestone for I-90/SR 18 interchange improvement project near North Bend

Contractor selection marks milestone for I-90/SR 18 interchange improvement project near North Bend [email protected] January 13, 2022 - 9:06am

Date
Kris Olsen
communications
News summary
NORTH BEND – The long-awaited improvement project at the interchange of Interstate 90 and State Route 18 is another step closer to reality following the selection of a contractor.

$190 million project includes widening SR 18, new bridges, and fish passages

NORTH BEND – The long-awaited improvement project at the interchange of Interstate 90 and State Route 18 is another step closer to reality following the selection of a contractor.

Aecon Pacific Northwest, Inc. submitted the best value proposal to complete the design and build the project following a competitive evaluation process.

“Aecon has built large highway, civil and private projects across the U.S. and Canada,” said Washington State Department of Transportation Project Engineer Mark Allison. “This is a significant project and one the community has anticipated for a long time. We look forward to working with Aecon to build an interchange that will serve people for many years to come.”

The I-90/SR 18 improvement project is design-build, which means WSDOT executes a single contract with one firm for design and construction. Design-build projects offer efficiencies in cost and scheduling. Construction is expected to begin later this year with completion in 2025.

Diverging diamond interchange

The I-90/SR 18 project will feature a diverging diamond interchange, which improves the flow of traffic by reducing the number of traffic signals and offering more free turns for drivers entering and exiting the interstate.

Diverging diamond interchanges are used around the world, with more than 100 operating in the United States. Washington’s first diverging diamond interchange opened in August 2020 at Interstate 5 and State Route 510 in Lacey.

SR 18 and Snoqualmie Parkway improvements

The I-90/SR 18 project also includes:

  • Widening approximately 2 miles of SR 18 from the interchange to Deep Creek, creating two lanes in each direction.
  • Construction of a new four-lane bridge over Deep Creek and a new two-lane southbound bridge over Raging River.
  • Adding a dedicated right turn lane from southbound Snoqualmie Parkway to westbound I-90.

Aecon Pacific Northwest, Inc. will begin work by completing design work for the interchange, a wider SR 18, new bridges and improved fish passages.

The $190 million project is funded through pre-existing gas tax funds and the 2015 Connecting Washington transportation fund, which is a $16 billion investment that enhances the statewide transportation system and maintains critical infrastructure.  

Contractor selection marks milestone for I-90/SR 18 interchange improvement project near North Bend

Contractor selection marks milestone for I-90/SR 18 interchange improvement project near North Bend [email protected] January 13, 2022 - 9:06am

Date
Kris Olsen
communications
News summary
NORTH BEND – The long-awaited improvement project at the interchange of Interstate 90 and State Route 18 is another step closer to reality following the selection of a contractor.

$190 million project includes widening SR 18, new bridges, and fish passages

NORTH BEND – The long-awaited improvement project at the interchange of Interstate 90 and State Route 18 is another step closer to reality following the selection of a contractor.

Aecon Pacific Northwest, Inc. submitted the best value proposal to complete the design and build the project following a competitive evaluation process.

“Aecon has built large highway, civil and private projects across the U.S. and Canada,” said Washington State Department of Transportation Project Engineer Mark Allison. “This is a significant project and one the community has anticipated for a long time. We look forward to working with Aecon to build an interchange that will serve people for many years to come.”

The I-90/SR 18 improvement project is design-build, which means WSDOT executes a single contract with one firm for design and construction. Design-build projects offer efficiencies in cost and scheduling. Construction is expected to begin later this year with completion in 2025.

Diverging diamond interchange

The I-90/SR 18 project will feature a diverging diamond interchange, which improves the flow of traffic by reducing the number of traffic signals and offering more free turns for drivers entering and exiting the interstate.

Diverging diamond interchanges are used around the world, with more than 100 operating in the United States. Washington’s first diverging diamond interchange opened in August 2020 at Interstate 5 and State Route 510 in Lacey.

SR 18 and Snoqualmie Parkway improvements

The I-90/SR 18 project also includes:

  • Widening approximately 2 miles of SR 18 from the interchange to Deep Creek, creating two lanes in each direction.
  • Construction of a new four-lane bridge over Deep Creek and a new two-lane southbound bridge over Raging River.
  • Adding a dedicated right turn lane from southbound Snoqualmie Parkway to westbound I-90.

Aecon Pacific Northwest, Inc. will begin work by completing design work for the interchange, a wider SR 18, new bridges and improved fish passages.

The $190 million project is funded through pre-existing gas tax funds and the 2015 Connecting Washington transportation fund, which is a $16 billion investment that enhances the statewide transportation system and maintains critical infrastructure.  

Contractor selection marks milestone for I-90/SR 18 interchange improvement project near North Bend

Contractor selection marks milestone for I-90/SR 18 interchange improvement project near North Bend [email protected] January 13, 2022 - 9:06am

Date
Kris Olsen
communications
News summary
NORTH BEND – The long-awaited improvement project at the interchange of Interstate 90 and State Route 18 is another step closer to reality following the selection of a contractor.

$190 million project includes widening SR 18, new bridges, and fish passages

NORTH BEND – The long-awaited improvement project at the interchange of Interstate 90 and State Route 18 is another step closer to reality following the selection of a contractor.

Aecon Pacific Northwest, Inc. submitted the best value proposal to complete the design and build the project following a competitive evaluation process.

“Aecon has built large highway, civil and private projects across the U.S. and Canada,” said Washington State Department of Transportation Project Engineer Mark Allison. “This is a significant project and one the community has anticipated for a long time. We look forward to working with Aecon to build an interchange that will serve people for many years to come.”

The I-90/SR 18 improvement project is design-build, which means WSDOT executes a single contract with one firm for design and construction. Design-build projects offer efficiencies in cost and scheduling. Construction is expected to begin later this year with completion in 2025.

Diverging diamond interchange

The I-90/SR 18 project will feature a diverging diamond interchange, which improves the flow of traffic by reducing the number of traffic signals and offering more free turns for drivers entering and exiting the interstate.

Diverging diamond interchanges are used around the world, with more than 100 operating in the United States. Washington’s first diverging diamond interchange opened in August 2020 at Interstate 5 and State Route 510 in Lacey.

SR 18 and Snoqualmie Parkway improvements

The I-90/SR 18 project also includes:

  • Widening approximately 2 miles of SR 18 from the interchange to Deep Creek, creating two lanes in each direction.
  • Construction of a new four-lane bridge over Deep Creek and a new two-lane southbound bridge over Raging River.
  • Adding a dedicated right turn lane from southbound Snoqualmie Parkway to westbound I-90.

Aecon Pacific Northwest, Inc. will begin work by completing design work for the interchange, a wider SR 18, new bridges and improved fish passages.

The $190 million project is funded through pre-existing gas tax funds and the 2015 Connecting Washington transportation fund, which is a $16 billion investment that enhances the statewide transportation system and maintains critical infrastructure.  

2021 ferry ridership nears 75% of pre-pandemic levels

2021 ferry ridership nears 75% of pre-pandemic levels [email protected] January 12, 2022 - 3:27pm

Date
Ian Sterling
communications
WSF media hotline
News summary
SEATTLE – Annual ridership aboard Washington State Ferries rebounded from 2020 pandemic numbers by almost 3.3 million customers in 2021 to nearly 17.3 million. The arrival of COVID-19 vaccines and a boost in tourism are the main reasons for the system’s largest year-to-year ridership increase on record.

For second year in a row, vehicles outnumber passengers in 2021

SEATTLE – Annual ridership aboard Washington State Ferries rebounded from 2020 pandemic numbers by almost 3.3 million customers in 2021 to nearly 17.3 million. The arrival of COVID-19 vaccines and a boost in tourism are the main reasons for the system’s largest year-to-year ridership increase on record.

For only the second time since it began operations in 1951, and the second year in a row, WSF carried more vehicles with a driver (8.9 million) than passengers (8.4 million) in 2021, as many continued to work from home or chose to drive on board because of the pandemic.

Current ridership trends

State ferry ridership in 2021 rose to roughly 72% of 2019 pre-COVID-19 numbers, with vehicles climbing to 85% and walk-on customers up to 42% of pre-pandemic levels. Ridership is expected to rebound further when COVID-19 eases and as WSF restores sailings closer to pre-pandemic levels.

“We’re in the process of planning our service restoration efforts as we continue to aggressively recruit, hire and train new employees,” said WSF Assistant Secretary Patty Rubstello. “Pandemic-related vessel crewing challenges and the temporary loss of one of our biggest ferries due to an engine room fire were two major service obstacles for us in 2021.”                   

2021 route-by-route ridership highlights

The greatest year-to-year increase came on the Seattle/Bainbridge Island route, where total ridership – vehicles and passengers combined – was up 44%. The boost lifts the run back into the top spot as the system’s busiest after dropping behind Mukilteo/Clinton and Edmonds/Kingston in 2020 for the first time in more than 40 years. The Anacortes/San Juan Islands route had the second largest growth at 36% with ridership on those runs reaching 95% of pre-pandemic levels. System highlights include:

  • Seattle/Bainbridge Island: Biggest year-to-year increase with total riders up 44%, led by a system-high rise in walk-on passengers of 54%; vehicles jumped a system high 32%.
  • Edmonds/Kingston: Total riders climbed 20%, vehicles grew 14%.
  • Mukilteo/Clinton: Total riders rose 14%, vehicles increased 11% to remain as busiest route for drivers.
  • Fauntleroy/Vashon/Southworth: Total riders up 13%, vehicles jumped 9%.
  • Anacortes/San Juan Islands: Total riders surged 36%, vehicles climbed 23%.
  • Seattle/Bremerton: Total riders grew 29%, vehicles rose 20%.
  • Point Defiance/Tahlequah: Total riders increased 18%, vehicles up 13%.
  • Port Townsend/Coupeville: Total riders jumped 22%, vehicles climbed 14%.
  • Anacortes/Friday Harbor/Sidney, British Columbia: The international route did not resume service in 2021 due to U.S.-Canada border restrictions and continued crewing and vessel availability challenges.

WSF, a division of the Washington State Department of Transportation, is the largest ferry system in the U.S. and safely and efficiently carries tens of millions of people a year through some of the most majestic scenery in the world. For breaking news and the latest information, follow WSF on Twitter and Facebook.

2021 ferry ridership nears 75% of pre-pandemic levels

2021 ferry ridership nears 75% of pre-pandemic levels [email protected] January 12, 2022 - 3:27pm

Date
Ian Sterling
communications
WSF media hotline
News summary
SEATTLE – Annual ridership aboard Washington State Ferries rebounded from 2020 pandemic numbers by almost 3.3 million customers in 2021 to nearly 17.3 million. The arrival of COVID-19 vaccines and a boost in tourism are the main reasons for the system’s largest year-to-year ridership increase on record.

For second year in a row, vehicles outnumber passengers in 2021

SEATTLE – Annual ridership aboard Washington State Ferries rebounded from 2020 pandemic numbers by almost 3.3 million customers in 2021 to nearly 17.3 million. The arrival of COVID-19 vaccines and a boost in tourism are the main reasons for the system’s largest year-to-year ridership increase on record.

For only the second time since it began operations in 1951, and the second year in a row, WSF carried more vehicles with a driver (8.9 million) than passengers (8.4 million) in 2021, as many continued to work from home or chose to drive on board because of the pandemic.

Current ridership trends

State ferry ridership in 2021 rose to roughly 72% of 2019 pre-COVID-19 numbers, with vehicles climbing to 85% and walk-on customers up to 42% of pre-pandemic levels. Ridership is expected to rebound further when COVID-19 eases and as WSF restores sailings closer to pre-pandemic levels.

“We’re in the process of planning our service restoration efforts as we continue to aggressively recruit, hire and train new employees,” said WSF Assistant Secretary Patty Rubstello. “Pandemic-related vessel crewing challenges and the temporary loss of one of our biggest ferries due to an engine room fire were two major service obstacles for us in 2021.”                   

2021 route-by-route ridership highlights

The greatest year-to-year increase came on the Seattle/Bainbridge Island route, where total ridership – vehicles and passengers combined – was up 44%. The boost lifts the run back into the top spot as the system’s busiest after dropping behind Mukilteo/Clinton and Edmonds/Kingston in 2020 for the first time in more than 40 years. The Anacortes/San Juan Islands route had the second largest growth at 36% with ridership on those runs reaching 95% of pre-pandemic levels. System highlights include:

  • Seattle/Bainbridge Island: Biggest year-to-year increase with total riders up 44%, led by a system-high rise in walk-on passengers of 54%; vehicles jumped a system high 32%.
  • Edmonds/Kingston: Total riders climbed 20%, vehicles grew 14%.
  • Mukilteo/Clinton: Total riders rose 14%, vehicles increased 11% to remain as busiest route for drivers.
  • Fauntleroy/Vashon/Southworth: Total riders up 13%, vehicles jumped 9%.
  • Anacortes/San Juan Islands: Total riders surged 36%, vehicles climbed 23%.
  • Seattle/Bremerton: Total riders grew 29%, vehicles rose 20%.
  • Point Defiance/Tahlequah: Total riders increased 18%, vehicles up 13%.
  • Port Townsend/Coupeville: Total riders jumped 22%, vehicles climbed 14%.
  • Anacortes/Friday Harbor/Sidney, British Columbia: The international route did not resume service in 2021 due to U.S.-Canada border restrictions and continued crewing and vessel availability challenges.

WSF, a division of the Washington State Department of Transportation, is the largest ferry system in the U.S. and safely and efficiently carries tens of millions of people a year through some of the most majestic scenery in the world. For breaking news and the latest information, follow WSF on Twitter and Facebook.

2021 ferry ridership nears 75% of pre-pandemic levels

2021 ferry ridership nears 75% of pre-pandemic levels [email protected] January 12, 2022 - 3:27pm

Date
Ian Sterling
communications
WSF media hotline
News summary
SEATTLE – Annual ridership aboard Washington State Ferries rebounded from 2020 pandemic numbers by almost 3.3 million customers in 2021 to nearly 17.3 million. The arrival of COVID-19 vaccines and a boost in tourism are the main reasons for the system’s largest year-to-year ridership increase on record.

For second year in a row, vehicles outnumber passengers in 2021

SEATTLE – Annual ridership aboard Washington State Ferries rebounded from 2020 pandemic numbers by almost 3.3 million customers in 2021 to nearly 17.3 million. The arrival of COVID-19 vaccines and a boost in tourism are the main reasons for the system’s largest year-to-year ridership increase on record.

For only the second time since it began operations in 1951, and the second year in a row, WSF carried more vehicles with a driver (8.9 million) than passengers (8.4 million) in 2021, as many continued to work from home or chose to drive on board because of the pandemic.

Current ridership trends

State ferry ridership in 2021 rose to roughly 72% of 2019 pre-COVID-19 numbers, with vehicles climbing to 85% and walk-on customers up to 42% of pre-pandemic levels. Ridership is expected to rebound further when COVID-19 eases and as WSF restores sailings closer to pre-pandemic levels.

“We’re in the process of planning our service restoration efforts as we continue to aggressively recruit, hire and train new employees,” said WSF Assistant Secretary Patty Rubstello. “Pandemic-related vessel crewing challenges and the temporary loss of one of our biggest ferries due to an engine room fire were two major service obstacles for us in 2021.”                   

2021 route-by-route ridership highlights

The greatest year-to-year increase came on the Seattle/Bainbridge Island route, where total ridership – vehicles and passengers combined – was up 44%. The boost lifts the run back into the top spot as the system’s busiest after dropping behind Mukilteo/Clinton and Edmonds/Kingston in 2020 for the first time in more than 40 years. The Anacortes/San Juan Islands route had the second largest growth at 36% with ridership on those runs reaching 95% of pre-pandemic levels. System highlights include:

  • Seattle/Bainbridge Island: Biggest year-to-year increase with total riders up 44%, led by a system-high rise in walk-on passengers of 54%; vehicles jumped a system high 32%.
  • Edmonds/Kingston: Total riders climbed 20%, vehicles grew 14%.
  • Mukilteo/Clinton: Total riders rose 14%, vehicles increased 11% to remain as busiest route for drivers.
  • Fauntleroy/Vashon/Southworth: Total riders up 13%, vehicles jumped 9%.
  • Anacortes/San Juan Islands: Total riders surged 36%, vehicles climbed 23%.
  • Seattle/Bremerton: Total riders grew 29%, vehicles rose 20%.
  • Point Defiance/Tahlequah: Total riders increased 18%, vehicles up 13%.
  • Port Townsend/Coupeville: Total riders jumped 22%, vehicles climbed 14%.
  • Anacortes/Friday Harbor/Sidney, British Columbia: The international route did not resume service in 2021 due to U.S.-Canada border restrictions and continued crewing and vessel availability challenges.

WSF, a division of the Washington State Department of Transportation, is the largest ferry system in the U.S. and safely and efficiently carries tens of millions of people a year through some of the most majestic scenery in the world. For breaking news and the latest information, follow WSF on Twitter and Facebook.

WSDOT seeks input on statewide Human Services Transportation Plan

WSDOT seeks input on statewide Human Services Transportation Plan [email protected] January 12, 2022 - 7:33am

Date
Matthew Kenna
Public Transportation Division
News summary
OLYMPIA – A group of transportation experts and providers, social services organizations, tribes and other stakeholders have worked together to over the past three years to update the Human Services Transportation Plan.

Public's chance to weigh in on access to mobility for people with special transportation needs

OLYMPIA – A group of transportation experts and providers, social services organizations, tribes and other stakeholders have worked together to over the past three years to update the Human Services Transportation Plan. The draft plan now is ready for public review and feedback.

Every day, people across the state rely on human services transportation as their only means of travel between jobs, school, medical appointments, the grocery story, and much more. The Human Services Transportation Plan identifies gaps and barriers that create mobility challenges for people with special transportation needs and develops strategies to address those issues. This statewide plan will guide local and regional plans as well as future human services transportation investments in communities.

The public is encouraged to visit WSDOT's online open house, where you can learn more about the plan and provide feedback. The online open house is available in English, Spanish and Russian languages for about two months beginning Wednesday, Jan. 5, 2022.

Additionally, WSDOT's Public Transportation Division staff will host a virtual public meeting from 2-3 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2022, for attendees to ask questions of the team who created the plan. Anyone interested in attending this meeting on Zoom must register in advance.

WSDOT seeks input on statewide Human Services Transportation Plan

WSDOT seeks input on statewide Human Services Transportation Plan [email protected] January 12, 2022 - 7:33am

Date
Matthew Kenna
Public Transportation Division
News summary
OLYMPIA – A group of transportation experts and providers, social services organizations, tribes and other stakeholders have worked together to over the past three years to update the Human Services Transportation Plan.

Public's chance to weigh in on access to mobility for people with special transportation needs

OLYMPIA – A group of transportation experts and providers, social services organizations, tribes and other stakeholders have worked together to over the past three years to update the Human Services Transportation Plan. The draft plan now is ready for public review and feedback.

Every day, people across the state rely on human services transportation as their only means of travel between jobs, school, medical appointments, the grocery story, and much more. The Human Services Transportation Plan identifies gaps and barriers that create mobility challenges for people with special transportation needs and develops strategies to address those issues. This statewide plan will guide local and regional plans as well as future human services transportation investments in communities.

The public is encouraged to visit WSDOT's online open house, where you can learn more about the plan and provide feedback. The online open house is available in English, Spanish and Russian languages for about two months beginning Wednesday, Jan. 5, 2022.

Additionally, WSDOT's Public Transportation Division staff will host a virtual public meeting from 2-3 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2022, for attendees to ask questions of the team who created the plan. Anyone interested in attending this meeting on Zoom must register in advance.

WSDOT seeks input on statewide Human Services Transportation Plan

WSDOT seeks input on statewide Human Services Transportation Plan [email protected] January 12, 2022 - 7:33am

Date
Matthew Kenna
Public Transportation Division
News summary
OLYMPIA – A group of transportation experts and providers, social services organizations, tribes and other stakeholders have worked together to over the past three years to update the Human Services Transportation Plan.

Public's chance to weigh in on access to mobility for people with special transportation needs

OLYMPIA – A group of transportation experts and providers, social services organizations, tribes and other stakeholders have worked together to over the past three years to update the Human Services Transportation Plan. The draft plan now is ready for public review and feedback.

Every day, people across the state rely on human services transportation as their only means of travel between jobs, school, medical appointments, the grocery story, and much more. The Human Services Transportation Plan identifies gaps and barriers that create mobility challenges for people with special transportation needs and develops strategies to address those issues. This statewide plan will guide local and regional plans as well as future human services transportation investments in communities.

The public is encouraged to visit WSDOT's online open house, where you can learn more about the plan and provide feedback. The online open house is available in English, Spanish and Russian languages for about two months beginning Wednesday, Jan. 5, 2022.

Additionally, WSDOT's Public Transportation Division staff will host a virtual public meeting from 2-3 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2022, for attendees to ask questions of the team who created the plan. Anyone interested in attending this meeting on Zoom must register in advance.

Expect over 10-mile backups for emergency roadway repair on northbound I-5 in DuPont

Expect over 10-mile backups for emergency roadway repair on northbound I-5 in DuPont [email protected] January 7, 2022 - 4:03pm

Date
Cara Mitchell
communications
News summary
DUPONT – Travelers heading north on Interstate 5 through DuPont in Pierce County will see long delays on overnight Saturday, Jan. 8 and through Sunday, Jan. 9.

Update Jan. 9:
All lanes and ramps reopened at 9 a.m., Sunday, Jan. 9 The contractor completed the repairs several hours earlier than planned.

 

DUPONT – Travelers heading north on Interstate 5 through DuPont in Pierce County will see long delays on overnight Saturday, Jan. 8 and through Sunday, Jan. 9.

Contractor crews working for the Washington State Department of Transportation will perform emergency repairs on northbound I-5 from Center Drive to Steilacoom-DuPont Road. The work requires reducing I-5 to a single lane between milepost 117.51 near Center Drive and milepost 119.7 near Steilacoom-DuPont Road. Due to the hours-long closures, travelers can expect significant backups and delays.

WSDOT needs your help

Travelers are strongly encouraged to avoid optional travel through the work zone, to carpool and to consolidate trips. If you must travel through the area, expect long delays. Top off your tank before you go to avoid running out of fuel in the backups. Travelers are also encouraged to have emergency kits in their vehicles.

Closure details

Starting at 7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 8 the following will close:

  • Northbound I-5 exit 118 to Center Drive.
  • Center Drive on-ramp to northbound I-5.
  • Northbound I-5 exit 119 to Steilacoom-DuPont Road.
  • Steilacoom-DuPont Road to northbound I-5.
  • Northbound I-5 exit to the Fort Lewis Weigh Station.
  • Far right lane of northbound I-5.

At 10 p.m., northbound I-5 will be reduced to a single lane. Crews will work overnight removing the damaged roadway and replacing it with new asphalt. At 7 a.m., lanes will begin to reopen, with all lanes and ramps fully opened by early afternoon Sunday, Jan. 9.

Detours

During the closure, drivers using northbound I-5 from Center Drive or Steilacoom-DuPont Road will go south on I-5 to Mounts Road, then go north. Travelers coming north on I-5 needing to exit to Center Drive or Steilacoom-DuPont Road will detour to 41st Division Drive and return on southbound I-5 to those exits.

“Closing Interstate 5 and multiple ramps like this during daytime hours is not something we take lightly,” said WSDOT Olympic Region Maintenance Manager, Matt Beattie. “The recent freezing and thawing of this section of I-5 has led to a significant breakdown of the roadway surface,” he added.

What's happening

Multiple potholes covering approximately two-miles of I-5 have formed in two of the northbound travel lanes near Center Drive at exit 118 and Steilacoom-DuPont Road at exit 119. During the recent cold weather, water made its way into the roadway surface and froze, which expanded the asphalt and allowed it to fall apart.

This week, maintenance crews performed numerous daily rolling slowdowns to temporarily fix these locations. The asphalt patches are not holding and are requiring more time to repair.

In addition, the size and number of the potholes are increasing. Crews need dry, slightly warmer weather and several hours for the asphalt mix to harden. Because of the traffic volumes and importance of keeping I-5 open for all travelers, WSDOT is initiating an emergency contract for this work.

Before heading out the door, travelers can find the latest information on the WSDOT app and by following the WSDOT regional Twitter feed.

Expect over 10-mile backups for emergency roadway repair on northbound I-5 in DuPont

Expect over 10-mile backups for emergency roadway repair on northbound I-5 in DuPont [email protected] January 7, 2022 - 4:03pm

Date
Cara Mitchell
communications
News summary
DUPONT – Travelers heading north on Interstate 5 through DuPont in Pierce County will see long delays on overnight Saturday, Jan. 8 and through Sunday, Jan. 9.

Update Jan. 9:
All lanes and ramps reopened at 9 a.m., Sunday, Jan. 9 The contractor completed the repairs several hours earlier than planned.

 

DUPONT – Travelers heading north on Interstate 5 through DuPont in Pierce County will see long delays on overnight Saturday, Jan. 8 and through Sunday, Jan. 9.

Contractor crews working for the Washington State Department of Transportation will perform emergency repairs on northbound I-5 from Center Drive to Steilacoom-DuPont Road. The work requires reducing I-5 to a single lane between milepost 117.51 near Center Drive and milepost 119.7 near Steilacoom-DuPont Road. Due to the hours-long closures, travelers can expect significant backups and delays.

WSDOT needs your help

Travelers are strongly encouraged to avoid optional travel through the work zone, to carpool and to consolidate trips. If you must travel through the area, expect long delays. Top off your tank before you go to avoid running out of fuel in the backups. Travelers are also encouraged to have emergency kits in their vehicles.

Closure details

Starting at 7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 8 the following will close:

  • Northbound I-5 exit 118 to Center Drive.
  • Center Drive on-ramp to northbound I-5.
  • Northbound I-5 exit 119 to Steilacoom-DuPont Road.
  • Steilacoom-DuPont Road to northbound I-5.
  • Northbound I-5 exit to the Fort Lewis Weigh Station.
  • Far right lane of northbound I-5.

At 10 p.m., northbound I-5 will be reduced to a single lane. Crews will work overnight removing the damaged roadway and replacing it with new asphalt. At 7 a.m., lanes will begin to reopen, with all lanes and ramps fully opened by early afternoon Sunday, Jan. 9.

Detours

During the closure, drivers using northbound I-5 from Center Drive or Steilacoom-DuPont Road will go south on I-5 to Mounts Road, then go north. Travelers coming north on I-5 needing to exit to Center Drive or Steilacoom-DuPont Road will detour to 41st Division Drive and return on southbound I-5 to those exits.

“Closing Interstate 5 and multiple ramps like this during daytime hours is not something we take lightly,” said WSDOT Olympic Region Maintenance Manager, Matt Beattie. “The recent freezing and thawing of this section of I-5 has led to a significant breakdown of the roadway surface,” he added.

What's happening

Multiple potholes covering approximately two-miles of I-5 have formed in two of the northbound travel lanes near Center Drive at exit 118 and Steilacoom-DuPont Road at exit 119. During the recent cold weather, water made its way into the roadway surface and froze, which expanded the asphalt and allowed it to fall apart.

This week, maintenance crews performed numerous daily rolling slowdowns to temporarily fix these locations. The asphalt patches are not holding and are requiring more time to repair.

In addition, the size and number of the potholes are increasing. Crews need dry, slightly warmer weather and several hours for the asphalt mix to harden. Because of the traffic volumes and importance of keeping I-5 open for all travelers, WSDOT is initiating an emergency contract for this work.

Before heading out the door, travelers can find the latest information on the WSDOT app and by following the WSDOT regional Twitter feed.

Expect over 10-mile backups for emergency roadway repair on northbound I-5 in DuPont

Expect over 10-mile backups for emergency roadway repair on northbound I-5 in DuPont [email protected] January 7, 2022 - 4:03pm

Date
Cara Mitchell
communications
News summary
DUPONT – Travelers heading north on Interstate 5 through DuPont in Pierce County will see long delays on overnight Saturday, Jan. 8 and through Sunday, Jan. 9.

Update Jan. 9:
All lanes and ramps reopened at 9 a.m., Sunday, Jan. 9 The contractor completed the repairs several hours earlier than planned.

 

DUPONT – Travelers heading north on Interstate 5 through DuPont in Pierce County will see long delays on overnight Saturday, Jan. 8 and through Sunday, Jan. 9.

Contractor crews working for the Washington State Department of Transportation will perform emergency repairs on northbound I-5 from Center Drive to Steilacoom-DuPont Road. The work requires reducing I-5 to a single lane between milepost 117.51 near Center Drive and milepost 119.7 near Steilacoom-DuPont Road. Due to the hours-long closures, travelers can expect significant backups and delays.

WSDOT needs your help

Travelers are strongly encouraged to avoid optional travel through the work zone, to carpool and to consolidate trips. If you must travel through the area, expect long delays. Top off your tank before you go to avoid running out of fuel in the backups. Travelers are also encouraged to have emergency kits in their vehicles.

Closure details

Starting at 7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 8 the following will close:

  • Northbound I-5 exit 118 to Center Drive.
  • Center Drive on-ramp to northbound I-5.
  • Northbound I-5 exit 119 to Steilacoom-DuPont Road.
  • Steilacoom-DuPont Road to northbound I-5.
  • Northbound I-5 exit to the Fort Lewis Weigh Station.
  • Far right lane of northbound I-5.

At 10 p.m., northbound I-5 will be reduced to a single lane. Crews will work overnight removing the damaged roadway and replacing it with new asphalt. At 7 a.m., lanes will begin to reopen, with all lanes and ramps fully opened by early afternoon Sunday, Jan. 9.

Detours

During the closure, drivers using northbound I-5 from Center Drive or Steilacoom-DuPont Road will go south on I-5 to Mounts Road, then go north. Travelers coming north on I-5 needing to exit to Center Drive or Steilacoom-DuPont Road will detour to 41st Division Drive and return on southbound I-5 to those exits.

“Closing Interstate 5 and multiple ramps like this during daytime hours is not something we take lightly,” said WSDOT Olympic Region Maintenance Manager, Matt Beattie. “The recent freezing and thawing of this section of I-5 has led to a significant breakdown of the roadway surface,” he added.

What's happening

Multiple potholes covering approximately two-miles of I-5 have formed in two of the northbound travel lanes near Center Drive at exit 118 and Steilacoom-DuPont Road at exit 119. During the recent cold weather, water made its way into the roadway surface and froze, which expanded the asphalt and allowed it to fall apart.

This week, maintenance crews performed numerous daily rolling slowdowns to temporarily fix these locations. The asphalt patches are not holding and are requiring more time to repair.

In addition, the size and number of the potholes are increasing. Crews need dry, slightly warmer weather and several hours for the asphalt mix to harden. Because of the traffic volumes and importance of keeping I-5 open for all travelers, WSDOT is initiating an emergency contract for this work.

Before heading out the door, travelers can find the latest information on the WSDOT app and by following the WSDOT regional Twitter feed.

Extreme weather affecting highways across the state

Extreme weather affecting highways across the state

Floodwaters on the side of interstate five reach the freeway
carlsob January 7, 2022 - 10:13am
Date
News summary
Rising floodwaters close Interstate 5 in Lewis County, mountain passes remain closed due to extreme winter weather and avalanche danger.

Rising floodwaters close Interstate 5 in Lewis County, mountain passes remain closed due to extreme winter weather and avalanche danger. 

Extreme weather affecting highways across the state

Extreme weather affecting highways across the state

Floodwaters on the side of interstate five reach the freeway
carlsob January 7, 2022 - 10:13am
Date
News summary
Rising floodwaters close Interstate 5 in Lewis County, mountain passes remain closed due to extreme winter weather and avalanche danger.

Rising floodwaters close Interstate 5 in Lewis County, mountain passes remain closed due to extreme winter weather and avalanche danger. 

Extreme weather affecting highways across the state

Extreme weather affecting highways across the state

Floodwaters on the side of interstate five reach the freeway
carlsob January 7, 2022 - 10:13am
Date
News summary
Rising floodwaters close Interstate 5 in Lewis County, mountain passes remain closed due to extreme winter weather and avalanche danger.

Rising floodwaters close Interstate 5 in Lewis County, mountain passes remain closed due to extreme winter weather and avalanche danger. 

Online open house for SR 702 and SR 507 roundabouts near JBLM and McKenna

Online open house for SR 702 and SR 507 roundabouts near JBLM and McKenna

A map of the three locations at which new roundabouts are proposed.
[email protected] January 5, 2022 - 4:07pm
Date
Dennis Engel
Multimodal Planning Manager
Sarah Ott
Region Traffic Engineer
Road
News summary
MCKENNA – Beginning Tuesday, Jan. 4, community members can learn more about safety improvements at three intersections on State Route 702 and SR 507 during an online open house.

MCKENNA – Beginning Tuesday, Jan. 4, community members can learn more about safety improvements at three intersections on State Route 702 and SR 507 during an online open house.

The Washington State Department of Transportation plans to replace the existing one- or two-way stops at three locations in Pierce County with new single-lane roundabouts.

Studies show roundabouts help reduce the potential for crashes while keeping people moving. WSDOT routinely reviews intersections in rural areas on the state highway system to find ways to reduce potential collisions.

Public feedback received during the online open house will help finalize the design of the roundabouts. Construction is scheduled to begin in 2024.

Locations

Two intersections are located on SR 702 east of McKenna:

  • SR 702 at 40th Avenue South
  • SR 702 at Harts Lake Road South

The third intersection is located south of Spanaway on SR 507 at 208th Street.

SR 507 and SR 702 roundabout pre-design study open house information

When
Tuesday, Jan. 4 to Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022

Where
engage.wsdot.wa.gov/hstp

Details
Participants will learn about the safety needs for the project, timeline and next steps.

Access for participation

Free Wi-Fi access is available through the Pierce County Library System for people who wish to participate in the online open house but do not have broadband service:

  • Eatonville Library, 205 Center Street, Eatonville
  • Graham Library, 9202 224th Street East, Graham

Additional Wi-Fi Hotspots are available via the Washington State Department of Commerce website.

Online open house for SR 702 and SR 507 roundabouts near JBLM and McKenna

Online open house for SR 702 and SR 507 roundabouts near JBLM and McKenna

A map of the three locations at which new roundabouts are proposed.
[email protected] January 5, 2022 - 4:07pm
Date
Dennis Engel
Multimodal Planning Manager
Sarah Ott
Region Traffic Engineer
Road
News summary
MCKENNA – Beginning Tuesday, Jan. 4, community members can learn more about safety improvements at three intersections on State Route 702 and SR 507 during an online open house.

MCKENNA – Beginning Tuesday, Jan. 4, community members can learn more about safety improvements at three intersections on State Route 702 and SR 507 during an online open house.

The Washington State Department of Transportation plans to replace the existing one- or two-way stops at three locations in Pierce County with new single-lane roundabouts.

Studies show roundabouts help reduce the potential for crashes while keeping people moving. WSDOT routinely reviews intersections in rural areas on the state highway system to find ways to reduce potential collisions.

Public feedback received during the online open house will help finalize the design of the roundabouts. Construction is scheduled to begin in 2024.

Locations

Two intersections are located on SR 702 east of McKenna:

  • SR 702 at 40th Avenue South
  • SR 702 at Harts Lake Road South

The third intersection is located south of Spanaway on SR 507 at 208th Street.

SR 507 and SR 702 roundabout pre-design study open house information

When
Tuesday, Jan. 4 to Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022

Where
engage.wsdot.wa.gov/hstp

Details
Participants will learn about the safety needs for the project, timeline and next steps.

Access for participation

Free Wi-Fi access is available through the Pierce County Library System for people who wish to participate in the online open house but do not have broadband service:

  • Eatonville Library, 205 Center Street, Eatonville
  • Graham Library, 9202 224th Street East, Graham

Additional Wi-Fi Hotspots are available via the Washington State Department of Commerce website.

Online open house for SR 702 and SR 507 roundabouts near JBLM and McKenna

Online open house for SR 702 and SR 507 roundabouts near JBLM and McKenna

A map of the three locations at which new roundabouts are proposed.
[email protected] January 5, 2022 - 4:07pm
Date
Dennis Engel
Multimodal Planning Manager
Sarah Ott
Region Traffic Engineer
Road
News summary
MCKENNA – Beginning Tuesday, Jan. 4, community members can learn more about safety improvements at three intersections on State Route 702 and SR 507 during an online open house.

MCKENNA – Beginning Tuesday, Jan. 4, community members can learn more about safety improvements at three intersections on State Route 702 and SR 507 during an online open house.

The Washington State Department of Transportation plans to replace the existing one- or two-way stops at three locations in Pierce County with new single-lane roundabouts.

Studies show roundabouts help reduce the potential for crashes while keeping people moving. WSDOT routinely reviews intersections in rural areas on the state highway system to find ways to reduce potential collisions.

Public feedback received during the online open house will help finalize the design of the roundabouts. Construction is scheduled to begin in 2024.

Locations

Two intersections are located on SR 702 east of McKenna:

  • SR 702 at 40th Avenue South
  • SR 702 at Harts Lake Road South

The third intersection is located south of Spanaway on SR 507 at 208th Street.

SR 507 and SR 702 roundabout pre-design study open house information

When
Tuesday, Jan. 4 to Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022

Where
engage.wsdot.wa.gov/hstp

Details
Participants will learn about the safety needs for the project, timeline and next steps.

Access for participation

Free Wi-Fi access is available through the Pierce County Library System for people who wish to participate in the online open house but do not have broadband service:

  • Eatonville Library, 205 Center Street, Eatonville
  • Graham Library, 9202 224th Street East, Graham

Additional Wi-Fi Hotspots are available via the Washington State Department of Commerce website.

Drivers on SR 169 near Black Diamond will move over to make room for fish

Drivers on SR 169 near Black Diamond will move over to make room for fish [email protected] January 5, 2022 - 3:57pm

Date
Tom Pearce
communications
News summary
BLACK DIAMOND – To give salmon a direct path upstream, people who drive on State Route 169 will need to make a slight detour starting Friday, Jan. 7. That’s when SR 169 will shift onto a temporary 1,000-foot-long bypass between Black Diamond and Maple Valley.

Update: The date of the shift to the bypass has changed to Thursday, Jan. 13, weather permitting.

Vehicles will use bypass while crews build new bridge, remove culvert

BLACK DIAMOND – To give salmon a direct path upstream, people who drive on State Route 169 will need to make a slight detour starting Thursday, Jan. 13. That’s when SR 169 will shift onto a temporary 1,000-foot-long bypass between Black Diamond and Maple Valley.

Once vehicles move onto the bypass just west of the existing highway, Washington State Department of Transportation contractor crews from Scarcella Bros., Inc. will begin building a new bridge for SR 169 over Ravensdale Creek. The bridge will replace a narrow culvert that keeps Chinook and coho salmon, steelhead and other fish from continuing upstream.

The crews also will remove one culvert and replace another in the Black Diamond Natural Area, opening an additional 2.4 miles of habitat for resident and migratory fish.

The Scarcella crews built the bypass this fall on the old highway right of way that runs through the Black Diamond Natural Area. The work closed about 1,000 feet of two trails. About 500 feet of trail following the old right of way will remain permanently closed. The remainder will reopen when work is complete in fall 2022.

The bypass will allow people in the 12,000 vehicles that use the highway each day to continue their travels with minimal disruption. When work is complete, the bypass will be removed and restored to a natural state.

Improving fish passage

This project will correct three culverts that currently block fish passage. Water travels through these culverts too fast for fish to continue upstream. In addition to the bridge for SR 169, the crews will build a new bridge for the trail that follows the railroad grade and restore a natural bed for Ravensdale Creek. They will remove the culvert under the old highway right of way and rebuild that creek bed as well.

Most of the funding for this $11.4 million project comes from the Connecting Washington funding package approved by the state Legislature in 2015.

Travelers can get real-time traffic information on mobile phones with the WSDOT Traffic app and by following the WSDOT traffic Twitter feed.

Drivers on SR 169 near Black Diamond will move over to make room for fish

Drivers on SR 169 near Black Diamond will move over to make room for fish [email protected] January 5, 2022 - 3:57pm

Date
Tom Pearce
communications
News summary
BLACK DIAMOND – To give salmon a direct path upstream, people who drive on State Route 169 will need to make a slight detour starting Friday, Jan. 7. That’s when SR 169 will shift onto a temporary 1,000-foot-long bypass between Black Diamond and Maple Valley.

Update: The date of the shift to the bypass has changed to Thursday, Jan. 13, weather permitting.

Vehicles will use bypass while crews build new bridge, remove culvert

BLACK DIAMOND – To give salmon a direct path upstream, people who drive on State Route 169 will need to make a slight detour starting Thursday, Jan. 13. That’s when SR 169 will shift onto a temporary 1,000-foot-long bypass between Black Diamond and Maple Valley.

Once vehicles move onto the bypass just west of the existing highway, Washington State Department of Transportation contractor crews from Scarcella Bros., Inc. will begin building a new bridge for SR 169 over Ravensdale Creek. The bridge will replace a narrow culvert that keeps Chinook and coho salmon, steelhead and other fish from continuing upstream.

The crews also will remove one culvert and replace another in the Black Diamond Natural Area, opening an additional 2.4 miles of habitat for resident and migratory fish.

The Scarcella crews built the bypass this fall on the old highway right of way that runs through the Black Diamond Natural Area. The work closed about 1,000 feet of two trails. About 500 feet of trail following the old right of way will remain permanently closed. The remainder will reopen when work is complete in fall 2022.

The bypass will allow people in the 12,000 vehicles that use the highway each day to continue their travels with minimal disruption. When work is complete, the bypass will be removed and restored to a natural state.

Improving fish passage

This project will correct three culverts that currently block fish passage. Water travels through these culverts too fast for fish to continue upstream. In addition to the bridge for SR 169, the crews will build a new bridge for the trail that follows the railroad grade and restore a natural bed for Ravensdale Creek. They will remove the culvert under the old highway right of way and rebuild that creek bed as well.

Most of the funding for this $11.4 million project comes from the Connecting Washington funding package approved by the state Legislature in 2015.

Travelers can get real-time traffic information on mobile phones with the WSDOT Traffic app and by following the WSDOT traffic Twitter feed.

Drivers on SR 169 near Black Diamond will move over to make room for fish

Drivers on SR 169 near Black Diamond will move over to make room for fish [email protected] January 5, 2022 - 3:57pm

Date
Tom Pearce
communications
News summary
BLACK DIAMOND – To give salmon a direct path upstream, people who drive on State Route 169 will need to make a slight detour starting Friday, Jan. 7. That’s when SR 169 will shift onto a temporary 1,000-foot-long bypass between Black Diamond and Maple Valley.

Update: The date of the shift to the bypass has changed to Thursday, Jan. 13, weather permitting.

Vehicles will use bypass while crews build new bridge, remove culvert

BLACK DIAMOND – To give salmon a direct path upstream, people who drive on State Route 169 will need to make a slight detour starting Thursday, Jan. 13. That’s when SR 169 will shift onto a temporary 1,000-foot-long bypass between Black Diamond and Maple Valley.

Once vehicles move onto the bypass just west of the existing highway, Washington State Department of Transportation contractor crews from Scarcella Bros., Inc. will begin building a new bridge for SR 169 over Ravensdale Creek. The bridge will replace a narrow culvert that keeps Chinook and coho salmon, steelhead and other fish from continuing upstream.

The crews also will remove one culvert and replace another in the Black Diamond Natural Area, opening an additional 2.4 miles of habitat for resident and migratory fish.

The Scarcella crews built the bypass this fall on the old highway right of way that runs through the Black Diamond Natural Area. The work closed about 1,000 feet of two trails. About 500 feet of trail following the old right of way will remain permanently closed. The remainder will reopen when work is complete in fall 2022.

The bypass will allow people in the 12,000 vehicles that use the highway each day to continue their travels with minimal disruption. When work is complete, the bypass will be removed and restored to a natural state.

Improving fish passage

This project will correct three culverts that currently block fish passage. Water travels through these culverts too fast for fish to continue upstream. In addition to the bridge for SR 169, the crews will build a new bridge for the trail that follows the railroad grade and restore a natural bed for Ravensdale Creek. They will remove the culvert under the old highway right of way and rebuild that creek bed as well.

Most of the funding for this $11.4 million project comes from the Connecting Washington funding package approved by the state Legislature in 2015.

Travelers can get real-time traffic information on mobile phones with the WSDOT Traffic app and by following the WSDOT traffic Twitter feed.

Active Transportation Plan: A new compass to guide the state’s active transportation future

Active Transportation Plan: A new compass to guide the state’s active transportation future carlsob December 21, 2021 - 2:27pm

Date
Barb Chamberlain
Active Transportation Division director
News summary
OLYMPIA – A statewide strategy and needs assessment for people who bike, walk and roll in Washington is now available online.

WSDOT releases its complete statewide Active Transportation Plan

OLYMPIA – A statewide strategy and needs assessment for people who bike, walk and roll in Washington is now available online. This comes just as Congress has enacted new federal initiatives – with programs in active transportation, safety and healthy streets – and the state is beginning to consider how new revenues from climate-related sources might be invested.

Gov. Jay Inslee noted that the plan addresses multiple challenges facing the state. “We need a greener future for our children and grandchildren and walking and cycling represent the cleanest and greenest modes of travel,” said Gov. Inslee. “We also need to make our system accessible for those people who can’t drive and who rely on walking or rolling to transit to get where they need to go—these multimodal journeys also contribute to our climate goals. I’m proud of our state for creating a bold plan to create safer and more accessible active transportation connections for all Washingtonians.”

The Washington State Department of Transportation completed its plan with a two-part process, releasing “Washington State Active Transportation Plan, 2020 and Beyond – Part 1” in May 2021, then collecting public comment on two final chapters this fall and compiling both sections into the full plan. The plan serves as a compass for charting the way toward a truly multimodal transportation system.

“Active transportation plays an essential role in a fully multimodal transportation system,” said Secretary of Transportation Roger Millar. “Almost 30 percent of the trips we take each day are less than a mile in length, yet we often drive because there is no safe alternative. We need to make it safer for people who are just trying to cross the street or ride their bike to school or work or to the store. With this plan, we’ve pointed the way to where and how we could invest in the system that works for everyone, no matter how they get around.”

Active Transportation Plan sets a course

Every Washingtonian uses active transportation connections at some point in a trip, whether crossing the street from their parking spot to their destination, walking to a bus stop or bicycling to school or work.

  • The plan assesses the needs for accessible pedestrian and bicyclist facilities, highlights safety concerns and provides the first-ever examination of state right of way and its suitability for active transportation.
  • It provides new metrics for tracking and reporting progress that emphasize the importance of complete and accessible walk/bike facilities and connections to transit and other modes, particularly in overburdened communities.
  • It calculates the environmental, health and economic benefits to society when people shift trips from driving to walking or cycling.
  • For consideration of future investments, the plan lays out a rational approach to prioritizing safety and operational performance needs on state highways as part of the overall networks people use to reach their destinations.
  • It incorporates the Safe System Approach, which emphasizes using engineering approaches that acknowledge humans make mistakes and that crashes with greater impact force are more deadly, especially for vulnerable road users.

The plan notes that improvements for people walking, rolling or cycling provide more information to drivers as well. It provides examples such as pedestrian-scale lighting and crossing visibility so drivers can see and stop in time. It also includes designs that provide a “self-enforcing road” to help people drive at the appropriate speed for a place with a mix of destinations and people walking or cycling. Making a road safer for the most vulnerable users also makes it safer for everyone, including the people who drive there.

For active transportation news updates including grant opportunities, webinars, and activities of WSDOT and partners subscribe to the WSDOT Walk + Roll E-News.

Active Transportation Plan: A new compass to guide the state’s active transportation future

Active Transportation Plan: A new compass to guide the state’s active transportation future carlsob December 21, 2021 - 2:27pm

Date
Barb Chamberlain
Active Transportation Division director
News summary
OLYMPIA – A statewide strategy and needs assessment for people who bike, walk and roll in Washington is now available online.

WSDOT releases its complete statewide Active Transportation Plan

OLYMPIA – A statewide strategy and needs assessment for people who bike, walk and roll in Washington is now available online. This comes just as Congress has enacted new federal initiatives – with programs in active transportation, safety and healthy streets – and the state is beginning to consider how new revenues from climate-related sources might be invested.

Gov. Jay Inslee noted that the plan addresses multiple challenges facing the state. “We need a greener future for our children and grandchildren and walking and cycling represent the cleanest and greenest modes of travel,” said Gov. Inslee. “We also need to make our system accessible for those people who can’t drive and who rely on walking or rolling to transit to get where they need to go—these multimodal journeys also contribute to our climate goals. I’m proud of our state for creating a bold plan to create safer and more accessible active transportation connections for all Washingtonians.”

The Washington State Department of Transportation completed its plan with a two-part process, releasing “Washington State Active Transportation Plan, 2020 and Beyond – Part 1” in May 2021, then collecting public comment on two final chapters this fall and compiling both sections into the full plan. The plan serves as a compass for charting the way toward a truly multimodal transportation system.

“Active transportation plays an essential role in a fully multimodal transportation system,” said Secretary of Transportation Roger Millar. “Almost 30 percent of the trips we take each day are less than a mile in length, yet we often drive because there is no safe alternative. We need to make it safer for people who are just trying to cross the street or ride their bike to school or work or to the store. With this plan, we’ve pointed the way to where and how we could invest in the system that works for everyone, no matter how they get around.”

Active Transportation Plan sets a course

Every Washingtonian uses active transportation connections at some point in a trip, whether crossing the street from their parking spot to their destination, walking to a bus stop or bicycling to school or work.

  • The plan assesses the needs for accessible pedestrian and bicyclist facilities, highlights safety concerns and provides the first-ever examination of state right of way and its suitability for active transportation.
  • It provides new metrics for tracking and reporting progress that emphasize the importance of complete and accessible walk/bike facilities and connections to transit and other modes, particularly in overburdened communities.
  • It calculates the environmental, health and economic benefits to society when people shift trips from driving to walking or cycling.
  • For consideration of future investments, the plan lays out a rational approach to prioritizing safety and operational performance needs on state highways as part of the overall networks people use to reach their destinations.
  • It incorporates the Safe System Approach, which emphasizes using engineering approaches that acknowledge humans make mistakes and that crashes with greater impact force are more deadly, especially for vulnerable road users.

The plan notes that improvements for people walking, rolling or cycling provide more information to drivers as well. It provides examples such as pedestrian-scale lighting and crossing visibility so drivers can see and stop in time. It also includes designs that provide a “self-enforcing road” to help people drive at the appropriate speed for a place with a mix of destinations and people walking or cycling. Making a road safer for the most vulnerable users also makes it safer for everyone, including the people who drive there.

For active transportation news updates including grant opportunities, webinars, and activities of WSDOT and partners subscribe to the WSDOT Walk + Roll E-News.

Active Transportation Plan: A new compass to guide the state’s active transportation future

Active Transportation Plan: A new compass to guide the state’s active transportation future carlsob December 21, 2021 - 2:27pm

Date
Barb Chamberlain
Active Transportation Division director
News summary
OLYMPIA – A statewide strategy and needs assessment for people who bike, walk and roll in Washington is now available online.

WSDOT releases its complete statewide Active Transportation Plan

OLYMPIA – A statewide strategy and needs assessment for people who bike, walk and roll in Washington is now available online. This comes just as Congress has enacted new federal initiatives – with programs in active transportation, safety and healthy streets – and the state is beginning to consider how new revenues from climate-related sources might be invested.

Gov. Jay Inslee noted that the plan addresses multiple challenges facing the state. “We need a greener future for our children and grandchildren and walking and cycling represent the cleanest and greenest modes of travel,” said Gov. Inslee. “We also need to make our system accessible for those people who can’t drive and who rely on walking or rolling to transit to get where they need to go—these multimodal journeys also contribute to our climate goals. I’m proud of our state for creating a bold plan to create safer and more accessible active transportation connections for all Washingtonians.”

The Washington State Department of Transportation completed its plan with a two-part process, releasing “Washington State Active Transportation Plan, 2020 and Beyond – Part 1” in May 2021, then collecting public comment on two final chapters this fall and compiling both sections into the full plan. The plan serves as a compass for charting the way toward a truly multimodal transportation system.

“Active transportation plays an essential role in a fully multimodal transportation system,” said Secretary of Transportation Roger Millar. “Almost 30 percent of the trips we take each day are less than a mile in length, yet we often drive because there is no safe alternative. We need to make it safer for people who are just trying to cross the street or ride their bike to school or work or to the store. With this plan, we’ve pointed the way to where and how we could invest in the system that works for everyone, no matter how they get around.”

Active Transportation Plan sets a course

Every Washingtonian uses active transportation connections at some point in a trip, whether crossing the street from their parking spot to their destination, walking to a bus stop or bicycling to school or work.

  • The plan assesses the needs for accessible pedestrian and bicyclist facilities, highlights safety concerns and provides the first-ever examination of state right of way and its suitability for active transportation.
  • It provides new metrics for tracking and reporting progress that emphasize the importance of complete and accessible walk/bike facilities and connections to transit and other modes, particularly in overburdened communities.
  • It calculates the environmental, health and economic benefits to society when people shift trips from driving to walking or cycling.
  • For consideration of future investments, the plan lays out a rational approach to prioritizing safety and operational performance needs on state highways as part of the overall networks people use to reach their destinations.
  • It incorporates the Safe System Approach, which emphasizes using engineering approaches that acknowledge humans make mistakes and that crashes with greater impact force are more deadly, especially for vulnerable road users.

The plan notes that improvements for people walking, rolling or cycling provide more information to drivers as well. It provides examples such as pedestrian-scale lighting and crossing visibility so drivers can see and stop in time. It also includes designs that provide a “self-enforcing road” to help people drive at the appropriate speed for a place with a mix of destinations and people walking or cycling. Making a road safer for the most vulnerable users also makes it safer for everyone, including the people who drive there.

For active transportation news updates including grant opportunities, webinars, and activities of WSDOT and partners subscribe to the WSDOT Walk + Roll E-News.

Salmon now swim freely under US 101 at Bagley and Siebert Creeks in Port Angeles

Salmon now swim freely under US 101 at Bagley and Siebert Creeks in Port Angeles [email protected] December 21, 2021 - 1:54pm

Date
Tina Werner
Communications
Dan McKernan
Project Engineer
Road
News summary
PORT ANGELES – Guess who’s back? Salmon and resident fish species have returned to two creeks that run under US 101 in Port Angeles following a $36 million fish barrier correction project.

$36 million fish barrier correction project wraps up

PORT ANGELES – Guess who’s back? Salmon and resident fish species have returned to two creeks that run under US 101 in Port Angeles following a $36 million fish barrier correction project. Scarsella Brothers, Inc. crews working for Washington State Department of Transportation have completed work in Bagley and Siebert Creeks.

“As tributaries to the Strait of Juan de Fuca, we know how important these channels are for spawning and migration,” said WSDOT Project Engineer Dan McKernan. “We appreciate the traveling public’s patience while construction was underway.”

Work at both locations opened 41 miles of potential upstream habitat for several migratory species, including salmon, bull trout and steelhead, as well as resident marine life.

Crews removed and replaced five outdated culverts as part of this project: two under US 101, two along James Page Road and one along South Bagley Creek Road. No additional lane closures are planned related to this work.

The project was completed on time and on budget.

A commitment to protecting the environment

Correcting fish passage barriers is an important part of the state’s efforts to protect and restore fish runs where culverts under state highways keep them from continuing upstream.

In 2013, a federal court injunction required the state to significantly increase the state’s efforts in removing state-owned culverts that block habitat for salmon, bull trout and steelhead.

Salmon now swim freely under US 101 at Bagley and Siebert Creeks in Port Angeles

Salmon now swim freely under US 101 at Bagley and Siebert Creeks in Port Angeles [email protected] December 21, 2021 - 1:54pm

Date
Tina Werner
Communications
Dan McKernan
Project Engineer
Road
News summary
PORT ANGELES – Guess who’s back? Salmon and resident fish species have returned to two creeks that run under US 101 in Port Angeles following a $36 million fish barrier correction project.

$36 million fish barrier correction project wraps up

PORT ANGELES – Guess who’s back? Salmon and resident fish species have returned to two creeks that run under US 101 in Port Angeles following a $36 million fish barrier correction project. Scarsella Brothers, Inc. crews working for Washington State Department of Transportation have completed work in Bagley and Siebert Creeks.

“As tributaries to the Strait of Juan de Fuca, we know how important these channels are for spawning and migration,” said WSDOT Project Engineer Dan McKernan. “We appreciate the traveling public’s patience while construction was underway.”

Work at both locations opened 41 miles of potential upstream habitat for several migratory species, including salmon, bull trout and steelhead, as well as resident marine life.

Crews removed and replaced five outdated culverts as part of this project: two under US 101, two along James Page Road and one along South Bagley Creek Road. No additional lane closures are planned related to this work.

The project was completed on time and on budget.

A commitment to protecting the environment

Correcting fish passage barriers is an important part of the state’s efforts to protect and restore fish runs where culverts under state highways keep them from continuing upstream.

In 2013, a federal court injunction required the state to significantly increase the state’s efforts in removing state-owned culverts that block habitat for salmon, bull trout and steelhead.

Salmon now swim freely under US 101 at Bagley and Siebert Creeks in Port Angeles

Salmon now swim freely under US 101 at Bagley and Siebert Creeks in Port Angeles [email protected] December 21, 2021 - 1:54pm

Date
Tina Werner
Communications
Dan McKernan
Project Engineer
Road
News summary
PORT ANGELES – Guess who’s back? Salmon and resident fish species have returned to two creeks that run under US 101 in Port Angeles following a $36 million fish barrier correction project.

$36 million fish barrier correction project wraps up

PORT ANGELES – Guess who’s back? Salmon and resident fish species have returned to two creeks that run under US 101 in Port Angeles following a $36 million fish barrier correction project. Scarsella Brothers, Inc. crews working for Washington State Department of Transportation have completed work in Bagley and Siebert Creeks.

“As tributaries to the Strait of Juan de Fuca, we know how important these channels are for spawning and migration,” said WSDOT Project Engineer Dan McKernan. “We appreciate the traveling public’s patience while construction was underway.”

Work at both locations opened 41 miles of potential upstream habitat for several migratory species, including salmon, bull trout and steelhead, as well as resident marine life.

Crews removed and replaced five outdated culverts as part of this project: two under US 101, two along James Page Road and one along South Bagley Creek Road. No additional lane closures are planned related to this work.

The project was completed on time and on budget.

A commitment to protecting the environment

Correcting fish passage barriers is an important part of the state’s efforts to protect and restore fish runs where culverts under state highways keep them from continuing upstream.

In 2013, a federal court injunction required the state to significantly increase the state’s efforts in removing state-owned culverts that block habitat for salmon, bull trout and steelhead.

State ferries to host virtual community meetings

State ferries to host virtual community meetings [email protected] December 20, 2021 - 3:48pm

Date
Dana Warr
communications
News summary
SEATTLE – Commuters, occasional riders and community members are invited to attend Washington State Ferries’ upcoming virtual community meetings designed to provide updates and answer questions about the ferry system.

Attendees will hear updates on ferry service challenges and the alternate service plan

SEATTLE – Commuters, occasional riders and community members are invited to attend Washington State Ferries’ upcoming virtual community meetings designed to provide updates and answer questions about the ferry system.

On Wednesday, Jan. 5 and Tuesday, Jan. 11, members of WSF staff will discuss the ferry system’s service and ongoing efforts to mitigate challenges as well as progress on key projects. WSF Assistant Secretary Patty Rubstello will lead the meetings in coordination with the Ferry Advisory Committees, appointed representatives of ferry-served communities who advise WSF. 

Both meetings will cover the same material and are designed to give people the option to join the meeting that best fits their schedule. Meeting participants will be able to ask questions and provide comments. People can join the meeting from a laptop, desktop computer or mobile device, but advanced registration is required to participate.

Registration for the January virtual community meetings:

  • Registration for 6 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 5.
  • Registration for 1 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 11.
  • Participants must provide a name and valid email address and have access to a computer or mobile device with an internet connection.
  • Once registered, participants will receive an email with detailed instructions on how to log in to the webinar.
  • The day after each meeting, a video recording will be available online on our community participation webpage

Free Wi-Fi access is available at these locations for people who wish to participate in the virtual meetings.

WSF, a division of the Washington State Department of Transportation, is the largest ferry system in the U.S. and safely and efficiently carries tens of millions of people a year through some of the most majestic scenery in the world. The system is celebrating its 70th anniversary this year. For breaking news and the latest information, follow WSF on Twitter and Facebook.

State ferries to host virtual community meetings

State ferries to host virtual community meetings [email protected] December 20, 2021 - 3:48pm

Date
Dana Warr
communications
News summary
SEATTLE – Commuters, occasional riders and community members are invited to attend Washington State Ferries’ upcoming virtual community meetings designed to provide updates and answer questions about the ferry system.

Attendees will hear updates on ferry service challenges and the alternate service plan

SEATTLE – Commuters, occasional riders and community members are invited to attend Washington State Ferries’ upcoming virtual community meetings designed to provide updates and answer questions about the ferry system.

On Wednesday, Jan. 5 and Tuesday, Jan. 11, members of WSF staff will discuss the ferry system’s service and ongoing efforts to mitigate challenges as well as progress on key projects. WSF Assistant Secretary Patty Rubstello will lead the meetings in coordination with the Ferry Advisory Committees, appointed representatives of ferry-served communities who advise WSF. 

Both meetings will cover the same material and are designed to give people the option to join the meeting that best fits their schedule. Meeting participants will be able to ask questions and provide comments. People can join the meeting from a laptop, desktop computer or mobile device, but advanced registration is required to participate.

Registration for the January virtual community meetings:

  • Registration for 6 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 5.
  • Registration for 1 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 11.
  • Participants must provide a name and valid email address and have access to a computer or mobile device with an internet connection.
  • Once registered, participants will receive an email with detailed instructions on how to log in to the webinar.
  • The day after each meeting, a video recording will be available online on our community participation webpage

Free Wi-Fi access is available at these locations for people who wish to participate in the virtual meetings.

WSF, a division of the Washington State Department of Transportation, is the largest ferry system in the U.S. and safely and efficiently carries tens of millions of people a year through some of the most majestic scenery in the world. The system is celebrating its 70th anniversary this year. For breaking news and the latest information, follow WSF on Twitter and Facebook.

State ferries to host virtual community meetings

State ferries to host virtual community meetings [email protected] December 20, 2021 - 3:48pm

Date
Dana Warr
communications
News summary
SEATTLE – Commuters, occasional riders and community members are invited to attend Washington State Ferries’ upcoming virtual community meetings designed to provide updates and answer questions about the ferry system.

Attendees will hear updates on ferry service challenges and the alternate service plan

SEATTLE – Commuters, occasional riders and community members are invited to attend Washington State Ferries’ upcoming virtual community meetings designed to provide updates and answer questions about the ferry system.

On Wednesday, Jan. 5 and Tuesday, Jan. 11, members of WSF staff will discuss the ferry system’s service and ongoing efforts to mitigate challenges as well as progress on key projects. WSF Assistant Secretary Patty Rubstello will lead the meetings in coordination with the Ferry Advisory Committees, appointed representatives of ferry-served communities who advise WSF. 

Both meetings will cover the same material and are designed to give people the option to join the meeting that best fits their schedule. Meeting participants will be able to ask questions and provide comments. People can join the meeting from a laptop, desktop computer or mobile device, but advanced registration is required to participate.

Registration for the January virtual community meetings:

  • Registration for 6 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 5.
  • Registration for 1 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 11.
  • Participants must provide a name and valid email address and have access to a computer or mobile device with an internet connection.
  • Once registered, participants will receive an email with detailed instructions on how to log in to the webinar.
  • The day after each meeting, a video recording will be available online on our community participation webpage

Free Wi-Fi access is available at these locations for people who wish to participate in the virtual meetings.

WSF, a division of the Washington State Department of Transportation, is the largest ferry system in the U.S. and safely and efficiently carries tens of millions of people a year through some of the most majestic scenery in the world. The system is celebrating its 70th anniversary this year. For breaking news and the latest information, follow WSF on Twitter and Facebook.